January 1, 2017

3D Priniting Makes Robotic Prosthetics More Accessible to ChildrenWashington University Medical lab is hoping to overcome two major obstacles for producing robotic prosthetics for children.Delanie Gallager, 10, shakes hands with her classmates, Michael Gallaway,11, and Dylan Day,11, at their St. Louis school. Photo by Cristina M. Fletes.At diditBot.com we usually review robotic technology that enhances our lives by doing household chores for us.  While having a robot that vacuums our floors or cleans our windows is helpful, those improvements seem minor to the advancements the researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine aim to make to the lives of children missing limbs.Raising Accessibility by Lowering the CostIn recent years robotic prosthetics have been helping veterans who have lost limbs on the battlefield. However at a cost of $25,000 to $50,000 making them for children who quickly outgrow them seems somewhat impractical. The lab at Washington University have gotten around that obstacle by creating a plastic arm for only a few hundred dollars using a 3-D printer.  The arm incorporates most of the same technology as the more expensive prosthetic. It uses myoelectric sensors that can detect contractions in the muscles of the stump signaling the prosthetic to move. Other labs try to make the robotic prosthetics function as close as possible to biological limbs which raise the cost.  Washington University has set their sights on lowering the cost by being able to make and modify the prosthetics more quickly than their more advanced counterparts. Biggest challenge is not what you thinkSurprisingly

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December 21, 2016

Are pets trying to warn us of Robotic Threat to Humanity?There’s an old joke about the difference between cats and dogs: A dog looks at its owner and thinks “You feed me, pet me, give me a place to stay and pick up my poop; you must be a god!” A cat looks at its owner and thinks “You feed me, pet me, give me a place to stay and pick up my poop; I must be a god!”By the reactions shown in the videos both cats and dogs obviously know robots will eventually take over the world from us humans. Those reactions also show us where our pet’s loyalties lie and that the joke has a little more truth to it than we originally thought.Dogs: Truly Man's Best FriendThe dog’s reaction is a warning to us, we should not be letting our future oppressors into our homes. Today they are cleaning our floors, pools and widows; tomorrow they will be cleaning our minds so we can be used as an energy source. Watch the Matrix if you don’t believe me. Being man’s best friend the dog was trying to destroy the robotic threat to human existence disguised as a vacuum before it destroys humanity.Cats: Looking out for Number OneThe cat’s reaction was one you would expect from someone you fancies itself a god. From the cat’s perspective the robot cleaner is not seen as a threat, it is just another servant to use as

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December 15, 2016

Many robot toys from the 1980s are now sought after by collectors due to their rarity or because they provide nostalgia for those who grew up in the 1980s. Here is a list of five robot toys that were popular in the 1980s: Steve the ButlerReleased by Playtime in 1986, Steve was not as handy around the house as one would have hoped.He was basically a remote control car with a robot shell.  He could bring you a cold drink but only if you placed it in his spring-loaded hands, sat down within range of the remote control and then drove him to you. DustbotDustbot is the forefather of today's robotic vacuum cleaners like the iRobot Roomba and the Dyson 360.  Released in 1985 by Tomy who produced a ton of toy robots in the 80's.  Dustbot featured large red flashing eyes and tiny arms holding a broom and dustpan that made a sweeping motion as it moved.  The little sucker could actually vacuum up little pieces of paper and crumbs from hardwood floors or other hard surfaces.  It even had edge detection technology to stop the retro vacuuming robot from falling off a table or desk its owner tasked it to clean. PS-B9Inspired by the B9 robot from the 1960's era TV show "Lost in Space", the PS-B9 was not nearly as useful as its inspirational forebear.  Made by Toshiba the only function the PS-B9 had was as a pencil sharpener.  Enough said. Mr.

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